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Food, Agriculture and Land Use
Food, Agriculture and Land Use
33 members
1 question
6 posts

Join this group to discuss climate solutions that focus on:

  • Resilient food production and consumption
  • Regenerative agriculture
  • Preserving and protecting biodiversity
  • Ecosystem integrity
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Jessica Driver
Communications Manager at Grounded
Intercropping is an Indigenous Land Management practice that involves multiple crops being grown together for the benefit of plant biodiversity, wildlife habitat, water retention, weed prevention, the mutual benefits of companion plants and soil health. Practices such as intercropping also help to prevent the need for synthetic fertilizers, too. Reducing use of chemicals in agriculture helps maintain high levels of soil organic matter, which benefits soil carbon sequestration. One important example of intercropping is the Indigenous method of planting of the Three Sisters. The Three Sisters refer to winter squash, maize (corn) and beans, which are three main crops of the Indigenous American people. When these crops are planted together, the corn creates a natural trellis for the beans to grow. The squash acts a cover crop to protect the soil and increase water retention and slow weeds. And the beans provide nitrogen, an important nutrient for plant growth, to the soil. Sometimes, a “fourth sister” is planted to attract pollinators. These include sunflowers (which can also act as a natural trellis), bee balm or the Rocky Mountain Bee Plant that deter birds with their seeds and attract pollinators. To learn more about the Three Sisters methodology, including how to plant these on your own, check out the Three Sister's Project and Sustainable Food Center websites. 📲: If you haven’t already, register for our upcoming panel, “The Future of Agriculture in a Warming World”: https://bit.ly/3NVnP9x 📷: Hatice Noğman #GroundedinSolutions #ClimateAcademy #agriculture #Indigenouslandmanagement #threesisters #soil #garden #farm #biodiversity #climatecrisis #intercroppingShow Le... (More)
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Jessica Driver
Communications Manager at Grounded
Join us on Tuesday, April 19th at 10 am PT / 1 pm ET for “The Future of Agriculture in a Warming World," a virtual panel. Tune in during Earth Week and listen to experts in agriculture and Indigenous land management discussing the ways that, together, we can transform the narrative and practices of agriculture while maximizing carbon storage in our soil.

Speakers include Adae Romero-Briones, Director of Programs of First Nations Development Institute, Loren Cardeli, Executive Director of A Growing Culture and Bhogtoram Mawroh, Senior Associate, Research and Knowledge Management at NESFAS.

Food security, healthy ecosystems, biodiversity and farmers’ and ranchers’ livelihoods are all essential to human survival. Yet, large-scale industrial agriculture is wildly destructive to our planet. We invite you to learn how we can implement climate solutions that connect us with our soil, our food and the Earth.

📲 Register here today: https://bit.ly/3NVnP9x

#GroundedinSolutions #ClimateAcademy #agriculture #soil #climatecrisis #climate #Earth #biodiversity #foodsecurity #carbonsequestration #nature
Answer
Duncan Steve McKain
Energy and Environmental Physicist

I have a garden of Eden. Not so much any more, but its still beautiful.

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